History

Netherlands

1. Mathieu van der Poel

France

2. Anthony Turgis

Luxembourg

3. Bob Jungels

  • Germany
    4. Lukas Pöstlberger
  • Belgium
    5. Tiesj Benoot
  • United Kingdom
    6. Luke Rowe
  • Belgium
    7. Danny Van Poppel
  • Belgium
    8. Yves Lampaert
  • France
    9. Christophe Laporte
  • Australia
    10. Heinrich Haussler
  • Belgium
    11. Jens Keukeleire
  • Norway
    12. Alexander Kristoff
  • France
    13. Adrien Petit
  • Belgium
    14. Jasper Stuyven
  • Slovenia
    15. Matej Mohoric
Year 11 22 33
2019
NL
Mathieu van der Poel
FR
Anthony Turgis
LU
Bob Jungels
2018
BE
Yves Lampaert
NL
Mike Teunissen
BE
Sep Vanmarcke
2017
BE
Yves Lampaert
BE
Philippe Gilbert
KZ
Alexey Lutsenko
2016
BE
Jens Debusschere
FR
Bryan Coquard
BE
Edward theuns
2015
BE
Jelle Wallays
BE
Edward Theuns
NL
Dylan Van Baarle
2014
NL
Niki Terpstra
US
Tyler Farrar
SI
Borut Bozic
2013
IT
Oscar Gatto
SI
Borut Bozic
AU
Mathew Hayman
2012
NL
Niki Terpstra
FR
Sylvain Chavanel
NL
Koen De Kort
2011
BE
Nick Nuyens
GB
Geraint Thomas
US
Tyler Farrar
2010
DK
Matti Breschel
BE
Bjorn Leukemans
NL
Niki Terpstra
2009
BE
Kevin Van Impe
BE
Niko Eeckhout
BE
Tom Boonen
2008
FR
Sylvain Chavanel
NL
Steven De Jongh
BE
Niko Eeckhout
2007
BE
Tom Boonen
BE
Niko Eeckhout
AU
Stuart O'Grady
2006
BE
Frederik Veuchelen
GB
Jeremy Hunt
FR
Lloyd Mondory
2005
BE
Niko Eeckhout
GB
Roger Hammond
IT
Gabriele Balducci
2004
BE
Ludovic Capelle
EE
Jaan Kirsipuu
GB
Roger Hammond
2003
AU
Robbie McEwen
AU
Baden Cooke
NL
Max Van Heeswijk
2002
AU
Baden Cooke
HU
Laszlo Bodrogi
BE
Jo Planckaert
2001
BE
Niko Eeckhout
BE
Wilfried Peeters
LV
Arvis Piziks
2000
NL
Tristan Hoffman
BE
Peter Van Petegem
DK
Lars Michaelsen
1999
BE
Johan Museeuw
BE
Michel Vanhaecke
BE
Chris Peers
1998
BE
Tom Steels
BE
Johan Capiot
BE
Andrei Tchmil
1997
BE
Andrei Tchmil
FR
Ludovic Auger
BE
Hans De Clercq
1996
NL
Tristan Hoffman
BE
Edwig Van Hooydonck
DK
Brian Holm
1995
NL
Jelle Nijdam
BE
Tom Steels
IT
Adriano Baffi
1994
BE
Carlo Bomans
BE
Marc Sergeant
BE
Ludwig Willems
1993
BE
Johan Museeuw
IT
Franco Ballerini
BE
Jo Planckaert
1992
DE
Olaf Ludwig
NL
Mauro Zanoli
BE
Jean-Pierre Heynderickx
1991
BE
Eric Vanderaerden
DE
Uwe Raab
DE
Remig Stumpf
1990
BE
Edwig Van Hooydonck
NL
Adrie Van Der Poel
BE
Marc Sergeant
1989
BE
Dirk De Wolf
NL
Theo De Rooy
BE
Johan Museeuw
1988
NL
John Thalen
BE
Fons De Wolf
NL
Nico Verhoeven
1987
NL
Jelle Nijdam
BE
Herman Frison
IE
Sean Kelly
1986
BE
Eric Vanderaerden
NL
Adrie Van Der Poel
NL
Peter Stevenhaagen
1985
BE
Eddy Planckaert
BE
Eric Vanderaerden
BE
Jef Lieckens
1984
BE
Walter Planckaert
BE
Rudy Matthijs
BE
Marc Sergeant
1983
BE
Etienne De Wilde
NL
Jan Raas
BE
Eric Vanderaerden
1982
NL
Jan Raas
BE
Jean-Luc Vandenbroucke
BE
Eddy Vanhaerens
1981
BE
Frank Hoste
NL
Cees Priem
BE
Gerrit Van Gestel
1980
NL
Johan Van Der Meer
NL
Jan Raas
BE
Guido Van Sweevelt
1979
BE
Gustaaf Vanroosbroeck
BE
Walter Planckaert
NL
Jan Raas
1978
NL
Adri Jos Schipper
BE
Frank Hoste
BE
Guido Van Sweevelt
1977
BE
Walter Planckaert
BE
Eric Leman
BE
Marc Demeyer
1976
BE
Willy Planckaert
BE
Marc Demeyer
BE
Walter Planckaert
1975
NL
Cees Priem
NL
Tino Tabak
BE
Roger Swerts
1974
BE
Louis Verreydt
BE
Ronald Dewitte
NL
René Pijnen
1973
BE
Roger Loysch
BE
Jos Abelshausen
BE
Freddy Maertens
1972
BE
Marc Demeyer
BE
Noël Van Tieghem
BE
Eddy Verstraeten
1970
BE
Daniel Van Ryckeghem
BE
Eric Leman
BE
Frans Verbeeck
1969
BE
Eric Leman
BE
Albert Van Vlierberghe
BE
Willy Van Neste
1968
BE
Walter Godefrood
BE
Willy Monty
BE
Bernard Vandekerckhove
1967
BE
Daniel Van Ryckeghem
BE
Georges Vandenberghe
BE
Jos Spruyt
1966
BE
Walter Godefroot
BE
Willy Bocklant
NL
Peter Post
1965
BE
Alfons Hermans
BE
Julien Haelterman
BE
Roger De Breuker
1964
NL
Piet Van Est
BE
Etienne Vercauteren
BE
Jos Dewit
1963
BE
Clément Roman
DE
Dieter Puschel
BE
Robert Seneca
1962
BE
Martin Van Geneugden
NL
Piet Rentmeester
NL
Piet Van Est
1961
BE
Maurice Meuleman
BE
Romain Vanwynsberghe
BE
Leon Vandaele
1960
BE
Arthur Decabooter
BE
Edgard Sorgeloos
BE
Julien Schepens
1959
BE
Roger Baens
BE
Louis Proost
BE
Briek Schotte
1958
BE
André Vlaeyen
BE
Norbert Van Tieghem
BE
Ernest Heyvaert
1957
BE
Noël Foré
BE
Michel Van Aerde
BE
André Noyelle
1956
BE
Lucien Demunster
BE
Frans Schoubben
BE
Andre Rosseel
1955
BE
Briek Schotte
BE
Fred Debruyne
BE
Alfons Vandenbrande
1954
BE
Germain Derycke
BE
Briek Schotte
BE
Florent Rondelé
1953
BE
Briek Schotte
NL
Adrie Voorting
BE
Marcel De Mulder
1952
BE
André Maelbrancke
BE
Lode Wouters
BE
Karel Debaere
1951
BE
Raymond Impanis
BE
Marcel Hendrickx
BE
Andre Rosseel
1950
BE
Andre Rosseel
BE
Emile Van Der Veken
BE
Jules Depoorter
1949
BE
Raymond Impanis
BE
Lionel Vanbrabant
BE
Maurice Mollin
1948
BE
Andre Rosseel
BE
Florent Mathieu
BE
Roger Desmet
1947
BE
Albert Sercu
BE
Julien Van Dycke
BE
Emile Masson
1946
BE
Maurice Desimpelaere
BE
Norbert Callens
BE
Briek Schotte
1945
BE
Rik Van Steenbergen
BE
Briek Schotte
BE
Norbert Callens

Yves Lampaert started cycling at the age of 17. After achieving a black belt in judo, He thought it was time for a new sport challenge. In 2013 Lampaert signed his first pro contract with Topsport-Vlaanderen and 2 years later he moved to Quick-Step. At that time his list of achievements was almost empty but Patrick Lefevere must had noticed the talent of the Fleming from Ingelmunster. In the beginning he worked as a servant for Boonen & co, but in his first year he already impressed with a 7th place in Paris-Roubaix. In 2016 he missed the Spring Classics after a fall in the Tour of Algarve and an Achilles Tendon injury incurred when someone hit him accidentally with a shopping cart.

With riders like Boonen, Terpstra, Gilbert and Stybar Quick-Step had an amazing team in 2017, which Lampie probably could take advantage of. In Dwars door Vlaanderen that year he was outstanding. Nobody could beat the supremacy of Quick-Step and Lampaert finished off the teamwork perfectly. 7 kilometers before the finish he escaped and he rode solo to Waregem. Winning this race in his backyard made him blissful.

In 2018 Dwars door Vlaanderen was moved to the Wednesday before the Tour of Flanders. Furthermore, the route was radically renewed. In this new edition the peloton has to tackle the Kluisberg twice and the Knokteberg thrice. This change didn’t bother Lampie. In a very rainy Dwars door Vlaanderen again he was super strong. In the final kilometer he escaped from the front group and rolled solo to the finish for the second year in a row. It remains to be seen which races Lampaert can add to his palmares.

Terpstra started out as a track cyclist, combining this discipline with road racing. That’s how he managed to snap up nearly every single Dutch title across several different disciplines. In 2005, he took home the silver at the World Championship for team pursuit. Belgium first caught wind of Terpstra in 2006 when he won the fourth stage of the Tour of Belgium. This was then followed by a fallow period of three years absent of victory,
until the Dutchman won the third stage of the Critérium du Dauphiné Libéré in 2009. One year later, he bagged the first of three national Dutch championship titles (2010, 2012 and 2015). In 2011, Terpstra switched from the German stable Team Milram to Patrick Lefevere’s Quick Step. It was a year without victories, but in 2012 he won Dwars Door Vlaanderen for the first time, after riding solo for 30 kilometres, marking the start of the his career’s finest era. He rode into sixth place in the Tour of Flanders, after team mate and the race’s winner, Tom Boonen. One week later he claimed the fifth place in Paris-Roubaix. At the end of that season, he snapped up his second national title riding solo for 50 kilometres and became the world champion in the team time trial. In 2013, he inched closer to victory, coming third in Paris-Roubaix and winning the team time trial world championship again with Omega Pharma-Quick Step.

2014 was a string of successes for the time trial specialist. He won the first stage in the Tour of Qatar and made it into the final ranking. Terpstra also won Dwars Door Vlaanderen a second time by being the only rider to stay ahead of the pack. In the ensuing interview with Sporza, the Dutchman revealed his cultural side. He answered the interviewer’s question by quoting the first lines of the lyrics to “Als je wint, heb je vrienden” (You always have friends when you win), by Herman Brood and Henny Vrienten. Two days later he finished second after Sagan in the E3 Harelbeke. He finished sixth in Flanders’ Finest the same as in 2012; however, one week later he hit the jackpot. He was the first to arrive in the Vélodrome, all on his own, winning Paris-Roubaix.

The most recent season was a bit of a let-down for the Dutch rider. He won the Tour of Qatar for the second time. However, in the Omloop Het Nieuwsblad he had to acknowledge the superiority of Ian Stannard. Luca Paolini was just a whisker ahead in Gent-Wevelgem, and outmatched, he lost the sprint in the Tour of Flanders to the tempestuous Alexander Kristoff. In autumn, he won the Tour de Wallonie and nabbed his third Dutch title. One thing is for certain, the career of the 31-year old Dutchman is far from over.

Niko’s nickname in the peloton was “Rambo”. And on that day he made it crystal clear that he was worthy of it in spades. Anyone who breaks free of the pack just eight kilometres into the race in those weather conditions, leaving the entire pack in his smoking wake in true Flandrien form, has got to inspire not just surprise, but above all admiration in his colleagues and the rest of the cycling world. “A lot of my colleagues in the pack know that I am quite capable. However, up until that point I hadn’t been able to prove my mettle as a first-class race due to some setbacks. Now I finally am where I want to be: a potential winner of prestigious races. I’m not thinking about top ten rankings in classics just yet, but I do think that I am capable of hitting the tier just below that.”

Eeckhout’s heroic victory in Dwars door Vlaanderen compensated for the bad after-taste of two previous setbacks, boosting his pride and ambition. First and foremost, for the previous edition the jury of Dwars Door Vlaanderen disqualified him because he was seen hanging onto the handle of a support vehicle. “Last year, I was even faster in this race, but the UCI commissioner disagreed. I don’t think anyone can accuse me of anything like that today.” And then there was the finish of Nokere Koerse, just one week before his victory. “As the strongest man in the race, I was swindled by someone who spent the entire time crying for mummy, who by some fluke found his wings in the last kilometre (Vanhaecke, ed.). Believe me, I was furious. Where my ship washes ashore in future is still a mystery. I’m just going to continue to work hard and we’ll see where I end up. More than ever, I am definitely convinced of one thing: there are still loads of victories in battle ahead for Rambo.”
And he was right. Four years later, on 23 March 2005, the West Fleming was able to lift the trophy a second time for Dwars Door Vlaanderen’s 60th edition. Unlike 2001, the jubilee edition of this race was positively sun-drenched. This time around, “Rambo” did not repeat his daring feat of 2001. From the start, the pace in the pack was devastatingly high, and the first serious break came at just 85 kilometres from the finish line, when fourteen riders took off just before scaling the Eikenberg. However, the pack wasn’t about to let them escape and caught up with them after six kilometres. Next, Koen Barbé launched another attempt, but he too was soon swallowed up by the pack again.

After climbing Kalkhoveberg and Paterberg, Eeckhout felt the time was ripe for some action, 55 kilometres from the finish line. Together with thirteen other riders, including Belgian compatriots Boonen, Van Petegem, Mattan and Devolder, he broke away from the pack entering the final round in the lead, with a group of nine riders. At the finish in Waregem this culminated in a sprint between eight riders - for Nico Mattan the pace was just a little too fast and he was forced give it up moments before - wherein Eeckhout went on to outperform Englishman Roger Hammond and the Italian, Gabriele Balducci. Another victory in the bag for “Rambo”, who is the tenth rider to sail across the finish line twice with his arms stretched victorious to the heavens in Waregem.

“Rambo”, who was 39 years old at this point, continued as a pro cyclist for a few more years, winning several races and finishing in the top three in several smaller races. That was until 2013, when he decided he’d had a good run, but that it was time to hang up his racing bike for good. Eeckhout was a professional cyclist for 21 years and with a handful of sweet victories in addition to those of the Dwars Door Vlaanderen, the Tour of Midden-Zeeland and the Belgian Championship he can look back on a fantastic career. However, Eeckhout, nearly 43, is matter-of-fact about it: “For quite some time it’s been really great, but it’s now time to call it quits. You can’t keep on racing.” Kevin Van Impe followed suit. Soon Eeckhout and Devolder were able to join them somewhat later, entering the final round as a group of five. When Van Impe tried to break away from them, the experienced Eeckhout immediately eased his way in, duking it out with Van Impe in a two-way sprint. Eeckhout began the sprint in the lead, but was caught off guard by Van Impe, who effortlessly sped away. Eeckhout was no longer able to steal back his lead and was forced to watch as Van Impe crossed the finish line first. He had no choice but to be satisfied with his second place win, and the fact that the record for Dwars Door Vlaanderen will remain at two victories for the time being.

In 1999, he came close to winning Ghent-Wevelgem, where he finished third and he snatched up fifth place in Kuurne-Brussel-Kuurne. Hoffman did win the first stage in the Driedaagse van West-Vlaanderen as well as emerging triumphant in Veenendaal-Veenendaal and the Clasica de Sabinanigo.

The year 2000 was his most successful season. The Dutchman won Dwars Door Vlaanderen for the second time in his career, sharing the record. That year, Hoffman also won the Tour van Made and piled the winnings up across the classics: fourth in Ghent-Wevelgem, fifth in the Tour of Flanders and fourth in Paris-Roubaix.

One year later, he even snapped up fifth place in the E3 Harelbeke. In 2002, he finished fourth in Paris-Roubaix and in 2004; he came very close to a victory in that same cobblestone classic. Magnus Bäckstedt beat him to the finish line in the sprint.

His career ended on 26 February 2015. In the Omloop Het Volk of that year, he hit a post and sustained a double open fracture of the tibia. After an extensive period of rehab, the Dutchman quit racing, and got started as a team leader at CSC.

There was no chance the Hoffman would disappear from the word of cycle racing, and from 2007 and 2010, he was the team leader at HTC-Columbia/Highroad. In 2011, he made the switch to Tinkoff-Saxo and to date, he is still a member of the staff of the Tinkoff team of world champion Peter Sagan.

Walter Godefroot, who was also known to the pack as “the Flemish Bulldog” was a professional cyclist from 1965 until 1979. His long list of victories includes ten stages in the Tour de France (including the very first final stage to end in Champs-Elysées in 1975), the Tour of Flanders twice, Paris-Roubaix, Liège-Bastogne-Liège, Ghent-Wevelgem, stages in Paris-Nice, stages in the Vuelta to name but a few. He also spent two seasons sporting the Belgian tricoloured jersey.

What’s more, Godefroot is one of the record holders of Dwars Door Vlaanderen. He and ten other riders are able to lay claim to having crossed the finish line first in Waregem twice. In 1966, he finished before Willy Bocklant and the Dutch Peter Post, two years later he was flanked on either side by Willy Monty and Bernard Van De Kerckhove on the winner’s stage.

In 1979, Godefroot retired as cyclist, but the “Flemish Bulldog” did not disappear from the pack. After his professional career, he worked as the team manager of IJsboerke, Capri Sonne and Weinmann. In 1992, he became the team manager of Team Telekom, returning in 2004 (the team was then called T-Mobile Team). Godefroot officially retired in 2005, but he wasn’t able to stay away from cycling for long. In 2006, he returned to the pack as a consultant to Astana; however, in 2007, he left this position after having been accused of involvement in doping practices.